Bank of America Tower

Essentially every innovative idea in green building is also in the Bank of America Tower, lending an astonishing range of sustainable attributes to BoA Tower's already considerable aesthetic appeal.

Everyone who follows New York real estate — or has merely found themselves walking on 42nd Street near Bryant Park in the last several years — knew that something spectacular was going up at 1 Bryant Park. As the stories about the Bank of America Tower continued to pile up, it all began to seem almost too much to be true. Was the Bank of America Tower really going to be New York’s first LEED Platinum skyscraper? Could the Bank of America Tower really look as graceful and forceful there in midtown Manhattan as it had in the pre-construction images implied? How well would the Bank of America Tower’s rainwater-recycling gray-water system and low-e insulated glass curtain wall work over a capacious 2.1 million square foot, 945-foot, 55-story building? The Bank of America Tower was really going to have a public garden room on 43rd Street?

Well, now we know the truth about the Bank of America Tower — and the answers to the previous questions are, respectively: “Yes,” “Also Yes,” “Very Well,” and “Yes, and it’s lovely.” All of which makes the vaunted Bank of America Tower a smashing success even before the specifics come into play. And the Bank of America Tower’s specifics are dazzling. Essentially every innovative idea in green building is also in the Bank of America Tower, lending an astonishing range of sustainable attributes to BoA Tower’s already considerable aesthetic appeal.

Several green buildings have sophisticated air filters — the Bank of America Tower’s eliminates 95% of airborne particulate and makes the air in the building significantly cleaner than the air outside. Some small buildings have gray-water systems — the Bank of America Tower has 269,000 gallons of rainwater storage, and circulates that water for use in irrigation, in the building’s toilets, and even (after running it through a basement purification system) in the cooling system. The Bank of America Tower’s HVAC creates ice at night, when demand dips, and then uses it for cooling purposes during the day. Each of the Bank of America Tower’s 55 stories of class-A office space are wrapped in low-e glass, which provides both stunning full-spectrum views and energy efficiency. And while most buildings strive to use less electricity, the Bank of America Tower actually produces it thanks to a super-efficient 5.1 megawatt generator in the basement.

The Bank of America Tower offers all this, as well as some of the most striking good looks of any new skyscraper in a generation and 2.1 million square feet of class-A office space. It had seemed impossible for an ultra-hyped building such as the Blank of America Tower — as great in sustainable innovations as it is in aesthetic ambition and sheer physical size — to surpass expectations. And yet… well, walk on 42nd Street. See for yourself.

Address
New York, New York  
Submarket
Bryant Park 
Certifications
LEED–NC Version 2.2, Platinum 
Stories
55 
Owner
The Durst Organization 
Architect
Cook + Fox  
Year Built
2009 
Square Footage
2.1 million square feet 
Notes
First LEED Platinum–certified commercial office building in New York City  

Features

  • Graywater System
  • Low-E Curtain Wall
  • On-Site Power Generation