LEED Gold Greenwich Street Towers to Break Ground at WTC in Early 2008

Silverstein Properties held a press conference last Thursday at its LEED Gold 7 World Trade Center to unveil updated architectural plans for neighboring Towers 2, 3, and 4 that will soon rise along Greenwich Street. Given today’s sixth anniversary of September 11, I thought it was appropriate to recognize these new buildings once again- all [...]

Silverstein Properties held a press conference last Thursday at its LEED Gold 7 World Trade Center to unveil updated architectural plans for neighboring Towers 2, 3, and 4 that will soon rise along Greenwich Street. Given today’s sixth anniversary of September 11, I thought it was appropriate to recognize these new buildings once again- all of which will seek a Gold rating under the LEED program. Silverstein expects Towers 3 and 4 (175 Greenwich Street and 150 Greenwich Street, respectively) to break ground sometime in January, with Tower 2 (200 Greenwich Street) following suit next July. The buildings will stand between Greenwich Street (which will now extend through the site) and Church Street, between Liberty and Vesey Streets; a 2012 occupancy is expected for each. The scope of the construction about to take place at the World Trade Center site is truly staggering- over $16 billion across a mere sixteen acres, according to the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey.

Norman Foster’s work at 200 Greenwich Street (which in my opinion is the most interesting piece of architecture that the project will produce) contemplates 2.3 million square feet of office space on sixty floors, 138,000 square feet of retail space, and four trading floors. Designed to resemble a cross with its sloping roof composed of four diamonds, the tower will become the second-tallest building in the city behind the Freedom Tower, topping even the Empire State Building when it reaches its height of seventy-nine stories and 1,270 feet. Each of the four blocks of office space that compose the tower are column-free and begin to taper back at the 59th floor in deference to the Memorial across the street (see image).

Richard Rogers’ 175 Greenwich Street will reach a height of seventy-one stories and 1,147 feet, boasting 2.1 million square feet of office space on fifty-four floors, five trading floors, and 193,000 square feet of retail space. According to Rogers, the design responds to the tower’s central site location- directly across the street from the axis formed by the Memorial’s two reflecting pools- by using a diagrid structural design, which emphasizes both the building’s east to west orientation and its verticality with respect to both the Memorial and the smaller 150 Greenwich to its south.

150 Greenwich Street, designed by Fumihiko Maki as a minimalist, “abstract sculptural presence,” will stand 64 stories and 975 feet tall, offering 1.8 million square feet of office space across fifty-six floors, as well as five retail floors. Silverstein has already signed the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey to a lease for one third of the available office floors; the agency was forced to relocate to a temporary home near Madison Square Park after its offices in Tower 1 of the World Trade Center were destroyed on September 11.

Six years ago it was unclear whether New York would retain its status as the world’s cultural and financial capital. While nothing is ever a guarantee, what is clear today, six years after an unspeakable tragedy, is that Lower Manhattan is about to finally take some major steps towards reclaiming its skyline- which is a great thing for all New Yorkers to feel very good about on what is still a very somber day in our great city.

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Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Silverstein, Port Authority Escalating Green Efforts at Ground Zero | gbNYC Real Estate Group | Commercial Real Estate & Green Buildings in New York City - Sunday, February 22, 2015

    [...] month, and the Port Authority will turn over Site 2 to Mr. Silverstein by the middle of the year. As you may recall, Norman Foster’s design for 200 Greenwich Street contemplates 2.3 million square feet of office [...]

  2. Excavation Complete, Silverstein Prepares to Break Ground at Gold Greenwich Towers | gbNYC Real Estate Group | Commercial Real Estate & Green Buildings in New York City - Sunday, February 22, 2015

    [...] on Wednesday finished excavation and foundation work at 3 World Trade Center. Respectively, the sites will be home to Fumihiko Maki’s 64-story, 975-foot minimalist 150 Greenwich Street and Richard [...]