214 West 29th Street

The pre–war 214 West 29th Street's art deco architecture and Energy Star label help it continue to stand out along a block that was once home to New York City's fur industry.


Located between Seventh and Eighth Avenues just south of Penn Station, West 29th Street was once home to New York City’s fur district during the 1920s through the 1950s. Even today, the street remains true to its Garment District roots with an ever-dwindling number of fur warehouses and showrooms still calling West 29th Street home.

But 214 West 29th Street stands out as one of the most pleasant surprises on this conveniently located block – architectural or otherwise, and not only on account of the Energy Star award it received in 2011 (with a score of 77). Built in 1920 and designed by architect Henry Oser, the 200,000-square-foot tower’s surprisingly beautiful entrance is flanked by two impressive stone gargoyles. One of the creatures appears to be examining the quality of a beaver pelt; the other is feeding a squirrel (symbolic of the fur industry nurturing the source of its lifeblood). Intricate masonry and elegant setbacks lend to 214 West 29th Street’s impressive facade, which gives the tower an imposing – yet graceful – presence over the rest of the block.

Typical floor plates in this Class B tower are approximately 14,500 square feet, with available individual office spaces anywhere from 3000 square feet to full-floor opportunities in the range of $30 per square foot. The 17-story 214 West 29th Street is served by 2 passenger and 2 freight elevators, with most tenants hailing from the design and creative industries.

Address
214 W 29th St, New York, New York  
Submarket
Garment District 
Certifications
Energy Star 
Stories
17 
Owner
Walsam 29 
Architect
Henry Oser 
Year Built
1920 
Square Footage
200,000 square feet 
Notes
Earned Energy Star in 2011 with score of 77. 

Features

  • 14500-square-foot floor plates
  • Original details in lobby